Industry News, March 2015

May 21st, 2015

The Value of the Swiss Franc Increases Suddenly: Making Sense of the

Swiss Flag

SNB’s Decision

By Aaron Recksiek, CW21

On January 15, the Swiss National Bank (SNB) ended its policy of trying to maintain a cap on the value of its currency compared to the euro. The policy was put in place in 2011, the last time the franc was considered “overvalued,” in an effort to reduce the country’s currency deflation and to promote growth of its industry. With exports making up more than two-thirds of the Swiss gross domestic product (GDP), a lower-valued Swiss franc translates to a healthier export market and, overall, to a healthier Swiss economy.
    To maintain the cap, the Swiss National Bank would purchase the amount of foreign currency, mainly euros, it needed to stay undervalued. The more Swiss francs that were exchanged for foreign currencies, the weaker the franc would be. If the SNB needed to purchase more currency, all it needed to do was print more of its own Swiss francs. By the end of 2014 the SNB had amassed foreign currency holdings worth over 500 billion francs—more than twice the amount it had in 2011.
    The main problem with investing in foreign currency is that the value of holdings is subject to unpredictable fluctuations in the market. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is in charge of administering monetary policy for the eurozone, was working on a solution to counteract much of Europe’s currency devaluation. The plan was to help improve their ever-weakening euro currency and provide stimulus to the stagnant European economies that have still failed to rebound from the worldwide financial crisis of 2008, by purchasing over a trillion euros worth of government bonds. This would have essentially required the Swiss National Bank to double down on its efforts to purchase euros to continue its currency devaluation, which would amass them a stockpile of European currency of such grand proportions likely never seen before. Many saw this as an unsustainable practice that would expose the historically conservative SNB to an extremely large risk: holding so much foreign currency—the value of which would be mostly out of its control.
    Another issue is the growing reserves of deposits held by lenders at the SNB. This only added to the strain of holding down the value of the franc. As the size of the deposits grew, so did the value of the Swiss franc. In December 2015, the SNB announced a plan to charge a negative interest rate of .25% on deposits of over 10 million francs, in an effort to reduce the amount of deposits. After the announcement to end the cap, the SNB official interest rate was lowered even further to a unprecedented -.75%. The Swiss franc has long been an attractive currency to invest in because of its historical stability. As the economic uncertainty in Russia and other European countries mounted, the investment in the Swiss franc had become excessive as of late.
    The rationale behind the decision of the Swiss National Bank to abandon the effort to cap its currency and essentially lose vast amounts of money based on the size of its foreign currency holdings has not been completely explained. It is believed by most that continuing to purchase foreign currency that had already grown to about 75% of its GDP would have grown a reserve too large, and the faith that the euro would do anything but decrease in value even further prompted the bank to cut its losses early and avoid the risk of losing even more in the future. The SNB also feared that its credibility would be hurt more by holding a greater amount of liabilities than assets and becoming insolvent than it would by going back on a promise it had made to buy “an unlimited amount” of foreign currency.
    So far the SNB stands by its decision to remove the cap. Jean-Pierre Danthine, vice-chairman of the SNB, was quoted as saying, “The risks of the policy to the economy had begun to outweigh the benefits.” He claims that the Swiss franc is no longer overvalued, and foreign markets will need time to adjust to the new flexible exchange rate. He also said the SNB is not going to completely abandon intervening in the foreign exchange market. They are reevaluating their strategy and have yet to announce their new plans.
    Obviously, this decision has consequences that will echo in all areas of the Swiss economy. In one day, the value of the Swiss franc jumped by 20%, and the value of the Swiss Stock Market (SMI) decreased by nearly 15%. Swiss watch brands’ stock value that traded on markets outside of Switzerland also fell on average 10–15%. The deflation within Switzerland, which had already dropped to -.25%, is expected to continue to deepen. Deflation is worrisome to modern economies because it increases the real value of debt and can lead to or aggravate an economic recession.
    What this means to the watch industry is immediately apparent to everyone involved. Swiss exports immediately became at least 20% more expensive, and the cost will either need to be absorbed by the margins of the Swiss companies or passed on to the consumer. The Swiss watch industry, which was already showing stagnant growth over that last couple of years, will inevitably show negative growth for the immediate future, something that has only happened once since the resurgence of Swiss watches in the early 2000s. Swiss-made parts and tools for watches will now be more expensive, putting strain on after-sales service and on watchmakers. The news of the cap removal came just days before the annual SIHH watch convention in Geneva, where several executives of Swiss watch brands were quoted as not knowing the exact repercussions the new exchange rate would have on the prices that were already predetermined in Swiss francs and euros. Many dealers reduced their orders or cancelled them completely. The most notable quote to come from a Swiss watch executive was Swatch Group’s CEO Nick Hayek, who said, “Today’s SNB action is a tsunami; for the export industry and for tourism, and finally for the entire country.”
    The fine-watch industry has become more reliant on the Swiss for tools, parts, movements, and complete watches. The silver lining is that now the cost of manufacturing and innovating outside of Switzerland has become more appealing than ever. It may now be cheaper and more stable to invest money in the growing industry in Germany, where certain brands have been investing in all facets of watch-parts manufacturing, and in the United States where the long-dormant industry has finally started to show signs of resurgence under a few pioneering brands that have vowed to lead the charge to restore American watch manufacturing back to the glory of the 1940s.

Sources
watchesbysjx.com/2015/01/news-switzerland-abandons-currency-cap.html
wornandwound.com/2015/01/27/speaking-francly/
bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-01-15/swiss-franc-surge-spoils-luxury-watch-party-as-local-costs-mount
nytimes.com/2015/01/22/business/international/swiss-watchmakers-jolted-by-currency-shock.html?_r=0
wsj.com/articles/swiss-central-banks-foreign-exchange-reserves-soar-in-2014-1422617398
http://qz.com/327410/absolutely-everything-you-need-to-understand-what-happened-to-the-swiss-franc-this-week/
economist.com/blogs/freeexchange/2015/01/switzerlands-monetary-policy

A Message from Our AWCI President, Fred T. White, CMW21, May 2015

May 21st, 2015

No one ever attains very eminent success by simply doing what is required of him. It is the amount and excellence of what is over and above the required that determines the greatness of ultimate distinction.

~ Charles Kendall Adams

Our midyear coFred T. White, CMW21, AWCI Presidentnference is over, and we had what I feel was a very good meeting.We opened the meeting with a prayer and the pledge of allegiance. The prayer that Joe Cerullo chose was the serenity prayer, which I believe speaks to the situation that we as watchmakers and clockmakers find ourselves in: “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” We reviewed what we had accomplished in the last several months, which is highlighted in the minutes of those months. According to a report on the James M. Dodson Perpetuation Fund, submitted by Dale Coates, our financial position is strong. Each committee gave a report on what they had done and what they hope to do in the future.
    It was a team effort, and the emphasis was to return AWCI to what our founding fathers believed we should be about, which is to educate everyone from the beginner to the most accomplished watchmakers and clockmakers to improve their skills. By doing so we can better serve our customers; it should be our desire to do the best job we can for our clients. There is no better feeling than to have a client come back to you or refer someone to you for a repair job.
    We are working toward getting the bench courses put back together so when an affiliate chapter or a large enough group wants a day class, a weekend class, or a weeklong class, we can bring it to them. We feel that would better serve our membership. These classes would be taught by instructors who are in various parts of the country. Work is being done on the watch technician program as well as a sales program for salespeople. Salespeople and technicians can ultimately become certified in these programs; but if they never become certified, the knowledge they can gain from such programs could be very valuable to them and the businesses they work for. By August 2015, we are going to pilot a program on battery replacement that will show how to replace a battery while maintaining a high standard of quality. We also plan to develop a new CMW21 program for those who wish to take that certification. We should look at certification as a measure of our ability and as an accomplishment to be proud of.
    When I think of a team, I think of a group of people working together to accomplish a common goal. Years ago I worked for Curtis Dworken as a manager of part of his business. When he hired me, he said, “We work together but I don’t want ‘yes men,’” meaning “Feel free to speak your mind.” That is what this Board of Directors does: We work through issues, try to solve problems, and we disagree at times without being disagreeable. Helen Keller said “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” We as watchmakers and clockmakers should take the advice of the serenity prayer and accept the things we cannot change, have the courage to change the things we can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

 

 

A Message from Our AWCI President, Fred T. White, CMW21, April 2015

May 21st, 2015

 No one ever attains very eminent success by simply doing what is required of him. It is the amount and excellence of what is over and above the required that determines the greatness of ultimate distinction.

~ Charles Kendall Adams

I hope the anFred T. White, CMW21, AWCI Presidentecdotes I’ve been sharing for the past few months about my time running a small business have been helpful and entertaining to some of you. One of my proudest memories is of the time we opened our jewelry store and had customers coming in;our hope was that we could be of service
to our community. We served the community for 26 years in the same location and had a lot of good and not-so-good experiences. (Gun-point robberies are not too pleasant.)
    We took a lot of pride in what we did, whether it was repairing a watch, clock, or a piece of jewelry, many of which were family heirlooms. Pride is defined as “great self-esteem; dignity.” We tried to finish each job and restore it to its original “like new” condition whenever possible. We worked to a high standard and wanted to hear, “Wow, that looks great!” or a report back that the watch or clock was keeping good time.
    We had printed on our thank-you envelopes: “IF YOU ARE HAPPY WITH WHAT WE DID FOR YOU, TELL SOMEONE ABOUT US. IF YOU ARE UNHAPPY, TELL US.” We were prompted to put this on our envelopes when a lady brought in a ring that she had just had made by another jeweler and was very unhappy with the results. I said, “Why not take it back to him?” She said, “He was so proud of his work that I cannot take it back.” I said that we would make the ring for her but we needed a sketch of what she wanted. She produced a very good sketch of what she wanted: her engagement diamond in the center and her mother’s and grandmother’s engagement diamonds on each side; all stones were set in four-prong heads, but not in a straight line. Right then and there the decision was made to use the tag line: “IF YOU ARE UNHAPPY TELL US, BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T WE WILL THINK EVERYTHING IS OK.”
    A happy customer might tell four of five people about you, but an unhappy one will tell as many people as will listen. So, do whatever you can to keep customers happy. Don’t be so proud of your work that you can’t see that someone is unhappy. We recently had a bad dining experience. The restaurant was cluttered, tables weren’t clean—the place needed attention. Our daughter told several of our friends about the bad experience with the statement: “I’ll never go back there again.” You and I do not want that to happen to our businesses.
    Always listen to customers and watch their body language. Sometimes the body language speaks volumes.
    In your business as well as your personal life, you can’t get more than you give any more than you can take a pint container to a well and bring back a gallon of water. You can’t give frowns and get back smiles; you can’t use a loud, angry voice and expect gentleness from others in return.

Note of Appreciation

Mr. Jon Safranek
has resigned from the AWCI Board of Directors.
We thank him for his service and wish him well.

A Message from Our AWCI President, Fred T. White, CMW21, March 2015

May 21st, 2015

 

It is with great pleasure that I welcome Mr. Tom Schomaker back to the classroom at AWCI.
He brings great skills, both as a watchmaker and an instructor, to our organization.
Welcome back, Tom!

“I Bargained with Life for a Penny and Life Would Pay No More….

 In last month’s PrFred T. White, CMW21, AWCI Presidentesident Message we discussed some of my experiences as an operator of a watch-repair shop for many years. This month let’s look at pricing our work for profitability. We all know the formula for how to look at our expenses: rent or mortgage, phone, auto, Internet, insurance, salaries, and various incidentals that may come up in the course of a year. But most of us forget to build in profit. How do you set your prices? Is it by what you think your competition would charge? How many of you are afraid to ask for the money? If you don’t ask for the money, people won’t just give it to you. How many times have you received a service or bought something and you said to the person serving you, “Here, take more.” (I’m not talking about tips). In the auto business we had a saying, “Hang the bacon high,” or, in other words, ask for more money—you can always come down.
    When we price our work, we should always ask for a fair price for our services. What is a fair price? What if you price a job and when the project is finished, you lost money? Was that a fair price for you? In the jewelry industry it is a common practice to mark things up keystone. Do you mark parts up when you buy them? I’ll assume that’s a yes. Good for you. Let’s assume you took an hour to research and find the part. Do you charge for that time?
    Let’s assume you repair 10 watches at $250 for a total of $2,500. But what if you raised your price by 25%? Now you can repair eight watches and make the same money. Learn to work smarter and make the same or more money, depending on the effort you wish to put into it.
    How do you overcome objection to your price? When people bring their timepieces to you, encourage them to talk about the item they brought to you. Some of them have an interesting history. If you get a watch that belonged to a favorite grandfather or was carried through a war by this person, or many other stories that can be told, you have a more-than-likely chance of getting a repair job. Very few watches bought at yard sales ever get repaired. I never pressure anyone to leave a repair job. Let them think about it. Some people experience sticker shock when a price is quoted. I always explain that the watch is fully disassembled, cleaned, reassembled, oiled, and adjusted. Also, I will point out my credentials. If they still want to think about it, that’s okay.    
    Think on your feet. Many years ago a customer brought in a clock for repair. We looked the clock over and gave her an estimate of $185. (When you give an estimate, don’t say anything until the customer responds.)
    The very next words out of her mouth were, “Can you do it any cheaper?” My reply was, “Yes, we can, but you have to go to your boss tomorrow and tell him to cut your salary.” I waited for her response. She said, “Fix it.” When you make a closing statement, wait for their answer.

 …I worked for a menial’s hire
Only to learn dismayed,
That any wage I had asked of life,
Life would have paid.”

~From the poem “My Wage” by Jessie Belle Rittenhouse

Industry News, January 2015

February 19th, 2015

Omega to Use New Whole-Watch Certification
By Donna HardyMontlanc's e-Strap

According to WatchPro, Omega has joined forces with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology (METAS) to produce a new, all-encompassing watch certification process to rival COSC.
    Omega will begin using the METAS certification process next year to test its watches using antimagnetic Master Co-Axial movement, but the process will be open to all  watchmakers.
    Nick Hayek, Swatch Group chief executive officer, Dr. Christian Bock, director of the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology, and Stephen Urquhart, president of Omega, at Geneva’s Cité du Temps announced the partnership on December 9, 2014.
    Hayek said that the partnership with METAS was the next logical step in the face of a COSC chronometer standard that he said “needs to be strengthened.”
    The new certification process will test whole watches rather than simply movements and will be carried out by the Swiss government body responsible for “all matters involving measurement and measuring procedures.”
    The process will include tests for precision during and after exposure to magnetic fields greater than 15,000 gauss. They will have to perform within a tolerance of 0 and +5 seconds per day for autonomy (functioning without winding, measured in hours) and water resistance.
    METAS will offer the Official Certification to any watch that meets these criteria and not only to Omega or the Swatch Group.

For more information, visit these websites—

http://www.omegawatches.com/news/internationalnews/international-news-detail/2838

http://www.hodinkee.com/blog/omega-developsa-new-watchmaking-certification-standard-withthe-swiss-federal-institute-for-metrology

http://www.fratellowatches.com/omega-master-coaxial-officially-certified-metas-announced-warninglong-opinionated/

Sources
WatchPro
watch-insider.com
ablogtowatch.com

A Message from Our AWCI President, Fred T. White, CMW21, January 2015

February 19th, 2015

Fred T. White, CMW21, AWCI PresidentBy this time, the holiday gifts have been opened and those that needed to be returned have been returned. The holiday decorations have been put away for another year. You have celebrated the New Year and made those New Year’s resolutions (you did make a few resolutions, didn’t  you?). I hope that one of them was to improve yourself. How do you go about improving? Take on a project that challenges you to do something that requires you to step out of your comfort zone. Listen to a motivational speaker either on audio or in person. How about reading a book that expands your knowledge on a subject of your choosing? Go to your local college and take a course or two. Maybe it might be something that would improve your health or wellbeing, like going for a brisk walk, joining an aerobics class, or going to the gym. President Harry Truman was known for his brisk, early-morning walks that challenged his secret service agents to keep up him. Maybe we should try to emulate this man. Take a walk along the seashore or go to the mountains. Whatever you choose to do, stick with it for at least one month, because it takes 21 days to develop a habit.
     Your goal may be to improve your business practice, learn more about how to use your computer, Excel spreadsheets, Google Drive, PowerPoint, or to develop a website for your business. Or maybe you want to learn more about accounting or better use of the telephone (phone manners). Take a course on business management or how to be a better salesperson.
     How about taking a course at AWCI’s state-of-the-art classroom, with our most excellent instructors. Whether you are a beginner or an accomplished watchmaker/clockmaker, AWCI is the place to improve your skills. You may want to review the article in December 2014 HT, “You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks,” by Michael Dempsey. It may change your mind about the class you have been thinking about taking.
     Maybe you should get on a committee and offer solutions to real or perceived problems. There is a committee volunteer form on our website, http://www.awci.com/about-us/2012-committeevolunteer-form/.

QR Code   
     A friend’s grandfather came to America from Europe, and after being processed at Ellis Island, he went into a cafeteria in New York City to get something to eat. He sat down at an empty table and waited for someone to take his order—of course, nobody did. Finally, a man with a tray full of food sat down opposite him and told him how things worked. “Start at that end,” he said, “and just go along and pick out what you want. At the other end they’ll tell you how much you have to pay for it.”
    “I soon learned that’s how everything works in America,” my friend’s grandfather said. “Life is like a cafeteria here. You can get anything you want as long as you’re willing to pay the price. You can even get success. But you’ll never get it if you wait for someone to bring it to you. You have to get up and get it yourself.”
     My wish for you this year is that you SUCCEED in everything you do.

 

 

A Message from Our AWCI President, February 2015

February 19th, 2015

The most important single ingredient in the formula of success is the knack of getting along with people.

Fred T. White, CMW21, AWCI PresidentAs the owner of an independent watch-repair shop for many years, I would like to share some of my experiences with you, with the hope that you may find this information helpful in your business. To be the operator of a business, you must be a self-starter. When you get out of bed in the morning, you must have the attitude that this is going to be a good day. A positive attitude is very important to your wellbeing. Who wants to deal with a grump? I once heard that “a bad attitude is like a flat tire—you are not going very far until you fix it.”
    One of my customers had a problem with her watch not running after it had been properly serviced. “Let me see your watch,” I said. I
started to wind the watch and discovered it was run down. I gave it a full wind and returned it to her. In a few days she was back because it stopped again. I wound it and returned it to her with the explanation: “You must wind it for it to run.” She said, “I do wind it.” “How much do you wind it?” I asked. Her reply: “Maybe four or five turns.” “You must wind it till it stops,” I said. She said okay and left the store. In a few days she was back again with the same complaint. I said to myself, “You must have PATIENCE. Sometimes you will need a bushel of it.” This time I took the watch in with the explanation that I was going to keep it for a week to 10 days. I was going to put the watch in every position and let it run for 24 hours in each position. When she came back, I gave her the results of my run out. The watch kept good time and ran fine during the time I had it. I said, “You must wind it.” Her response was, “I’ll break the mainspring.” I replied, “Break the darn mainspring! I’ll give you a new one.” After that, there was no more problem with the watch, and she remained a good customer for several years.
    
There are several lessons in this story (which is a true story).
     1. Do your best to satisfy your customer.
     2. Have patience with any situation.
     3. Keep a good attitude.
   
4. Always think on your feet and come up with a solution to the problem. For every problem there is a solution. Sometimes we have to do some digging to find it.
    Satisfy your customer if you can. Does that mean the customer is always right? No, of course not. After you have tried every avenue to satisfy, there does come a point where you have to say that maybe it is best that we part company. This doesn’t happen often.
     Practicing patience means that we try to put ourselves in their shoes. Look at the problem from their perspective; try to see it through their eyes. If you do find yourself losing it, excuse yourself, walk away, take a deep breath, and get a drink (of water). Come back to the customer and try to solve the problem. There are some situations where you can’t make them happy, and that is when it is best that you part company.
     A positive attitude will serve you well. It keeps you thinking that you can overcome whatever obstacle is in you way. You feel better about yourself.
So remain positive.
     Sometimes the solution will just come to you from who knows where. Sometimes you have to beak some mainsprings. (Change your way of thinking.) Here is a motto for small-business owners to live by: IF IT’S TO BE, IT’S UP TO ME.

 

 

Industry News, February 2015

February 19th, 2015

Montblac Procedures
the e-Strap
Montlanc's e-Strap
By Donna Hardy

Montblanc’s e-Strap might be the first smart, connected wearable from a luxury watch company

Montblanc’s upcoming Timewalker Urban Speed collection of watches will have an optional strap called the e-Strap. It features a high-end leather strap with carbon-fiber texture. At the bottom, sitting under the wrist, is an electronic module made from DLC (diamond-like carbon) coated steel or in gray steel. The e-Strap’s module is 40mm long, 14.2mm wide, and 9mm high (thick).
     Ariel Adams of ablogtowatch. com asks, “Why isn’t Montblanc simply producing a smartwatch that combines technology with luxury watch design and materials? Well, according to most people in the luxury watch world, that isn’t what most of their consumers want….So, for Montblanc and other luxury watchmakers, they are taking charge by offering what they feel is the ultimate combo–a traditional mechanical luxury watch with a strap that contains a smart wearable device.”
     Not all Timewalker Urban Speed watches will have the e-Strap. It will come on a few of the new 2015 Montblanc Timewalker Urban Speed watches, but it can also be purchased separately.
     The Montblanc e-Strap will be compatible with all 42mm- or 43mm-wide Timewalker watches currently or previously available. It should be able to fit other watches with similar lug space sizes.
     The e-Strap’s electronic module will have a 0.9″ monochromatic OLED touchscreen display with a 128 x 36 pixel resolution. It will be able to handle basic calls, texts, emails, calendars, social media, and reminder notifications. The e-Strap will also function as an activity monitor/tracker with a pedometer and accelerometer to measure data that feeds into the accompanying iPhone or Android smartphone application. It will also be able to control your phone’s music player. The Montblanc e-Strap will use Bluetooth 4.0 to connect to its host phone device.
     The e-Strap will have five days of continuous use between charges, using its internal lithium ion battery. A micro-USB charging port is built in. Montblanc claims the e-Strap is shock resistant and splash resistant.
     According to a report on mashable. com, “The e-Strap ($300) will be much cheaper than the watches it will support—many of Montblanc’s timepieces cost as much as $3,000—but run higher than some smartwatches like the Moto 360 ($249). The Apple Watch will start at $349, but it’s rumored the luxury ‘Edition’ model (like the 18-karat pink or yellow gold version) could cost up to $5,000.”
     Ariel Adams concludes: “While it doesn’t represent the sentiments of all luxury watchmakers, Montblanc’s upcoming release of the e-Strap is a healthy sign that the often-conservative luxury watch industry is trying to work with smartwatches rather than ignore them.”

Sources
ablogtowatch.com
mashable.com

Congratulations!

January 5th, 2015

to our members who recently passed the CW21 exam

Joseph Daley

Brandon Dark

John DeBoom

Cecilia Dunn

Miraslov Dvorak

Pete Evans

Ryan Harrington

James Hochmuth

Michael Laskoski

Trevor Reis

Mort Robinson

Toran Sheftick

Miguel Sherlock

Lorena Wilkinson

PA

NC

PA

WA

CA

PA

PA

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Toronto, ON

PA

VA

NY

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OK

Welcome to Our Newest AWCI Members (Oct-Dec 2014)

January 5th, 2015

Karson Barnes

Christian Bolling

Luke Boysen

Hayden Brown

Josiah Butterfield

David Cohen

Jeff Cohen

Michael Craig

Tyler Daniel

Matthew Demert

Karin Dickinson

Lee Dowell

Chase Duquette

Erik Dyrdal

John C. Figlar

Gary Flatt

David Glasser

Katharine M. Harris

Joseph Hefferon

Ross Hudson

Buddy Huguley

Josh Joyce

Reza Khalaj

Trevor Kilpatrick

Richard Legnani

Nicholas Manousos

Dalfret Martin

Michael McDonell

Gregg G. Metzler

Seth Mueller

Derek Niles

Ariel Ochoa

Michael Oransky

Luis Orozco Jr.

Chris Paoliello

Kevin R. Peavey

Robert Peterman

Christopher Pilant

Edward Popiel

Alfred Ptasznik Jr.

Cody Rieff

Justin C. Rogers

Marcin Ruszczyk

Jeremy Salewsky

Anthony Scatena

Alec Sessa

Kenneth Settles

Ben Shankland

Steve Shimonov Sr.

Douglas Smith

Kevin Smith

Robert E. Smith

William R. Stiles

Eric Storlie

Grace To

Dalton Toledo

Jose Vega

Jacob M. Weaver-Spidel

James J. Wienandt

Sabastian Wilkinson

IL

CO

WA

IL

WA

NY

IL

MI

PA

NC

TX

PA

WA

WA

PA

PA

OH

WA

VA

WA

MD

PA

GA

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CT

NY

FL

IL

NJ

WA

PA

IL

PA

CO

WA

IL

NY

PA

OH

VA

WA

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CT

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IN

IL

NY

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FL

CO

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OR

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