Archive for the ‘News’ Category

A Message from Our AWCI President, September 2014

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Manuel Yazijian, CMW21, AWCI President

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

It has been quite an interesting journey these past two years while at the helm of the ship called “AWCI.” This will be my last president’s message, as I am only allowed to serve a maximum of two years as per our bylaws. While there were requests and attempts by certain members to extend the term of the president to a third year, the Board of Directors will be deciding this issue at the annual convention in Clinton,
Maryland, this August. At the time I am writing this column, this decision has not yet been made, and you will be informed of this matter in a subsequent issue of this magazine.
     I would like to take the opportunity to thank our very own Terry Kurdzionak, who in her position as secretary has done an outstanding job of producing the minutes of our meetings as well as for her tireless efforts in organizing our annual convention. Thank you for your insight, your help, and your availability at all times to help with the running of our organization.
     Also, a personal thanks to Herman Mayer and his team of instructors from the Lititz Watch Technicum for teaching the outstanding courses over the past year in our headquarters in Harrison, Ohio. On behalf of AWCI, I thank you for your generosity. Your in-kind contribution has helped the institute as well as its members. Most importantly, you have made a lasting impression on all the students who attended classes taught by your professional team.
     Last but not least, I would like to thank the active members of the Spare Parts Directory Committee chaired by Drew Zimmerman for planning, contributing, and calling all the watch companies. Also a special thank you to Jordan Ficklin for the countless hours of work poured into this very important project and for taking care of the design and “electronic” side of it. The results of this project will be shared with the membership shortly.
     Many of you may not know, but when I first joined this organization in 1997, I was under the impression that by joining the only professional watchmaking organization of its kind in North America, I would automatically be recognized as a professional by watch companies that would subsequently grant me a spare parts account. I quickly found this to be not the case. I was quite disappointed when companies continued to refuse supplying me with spare parts, and I lost many nights of sleep. For better or worse, I was not deterred by this and continued to be more involved with AWI (which became AWCI in 2004), where I chaired the committee with the same name, and the Spare Parts Directory list was first published in 2004. Times were different then and the list was published only once in our magazine. While this helped a small segment of our readership at the time, we have now done it again. However, this time it is available on our website for all of the world to see. First, watch owners will benefit from it most as they will know which brands supply parts and will thus make their watch-purchasing decisions accordingly. Second, watchmakers will use it to see which brands will offer support. This will affect their decision as to which brands to work on and therefore not waste their precious time on uncooperative and restrictive brands’ products. The services and skills of those who work to the highest standards are an irreplaceable asset to watch brands, and, conversely, those who do not yet adhere to this code can be considered to be counterproductive to the brand image as well as to the whole industry. And third, watch brands can visit this directory to view the policies of other, more successful, and, quite often, competing brands. While a brand can choose to restrict parts, ultimately those who make parts available to qualified and professionally minded individuals who are properly trained will continue to prosper in this delicate luxury industry. Brands are encouraged to contact Jordan Ficklin, our executive director, to correct any erroneous information or to report a change in their spare parts policy.
     As stated on numerous occasions, the relationship between watch manufacturers, suppliers, retailers/jewelers, and independent watch-repair individuals is a delicate and important one to the point of being symbiotic. While many brands in the watch-manufacturing industry have more or less stumbled through the past decades all the way to the 21st century, it is true the face of the watch-manufacturing and watch-repair profession is always changing. Yet it seems the more it changes, the more it remains the same, for all one has to do is to read some of the older publications from the 1920s through the 1980s—it seems history is always repeating itself. While this last phrase is a cliché, it is also true that those who learn from history will be more successful, mainly by not repeating the mistakes of the past and most importantly by learning from the mistakes of others. Do we really need to reinvent the wheel?
     In this vein, in order for our ship to go forward and reach the common destination, it would be best if everyone could work together with mutual respect. Inevitably, there will be some disagreements between the various parties, for such is the nature of life. However, a common ground and a “meet me halfway” situation must be reached. Otherwise, we all will sail in our own directions, where some will succeed and others will fail, and we may be faced with yet another “lost generation” of watchmakers in the near future. Which of you wants to be responsible for single-handedly creating another “lost generation?”
     Ultimately, we can achieve much more if we can think “what’s good for the whole profession?” versus “what’s good for me?” My hope rests with the next generation as well as those who can step out of their own skin for a moment and think of how they can make it better for the entire industry.
As a forever message to all, always keep your skills honed, your standards very high, your attitude professional, your tools and equipment in great condition, and your workshops clean and organized, as this is the only way we will excel, not only as watchmakers and clockmakers but also as upstanding human beings.

A Message from Our AWCI President, August 2014

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

While we may complain about a variety of situations, such as the lack of spare parts, and this is certainly a valid concern, the main issue still remains—the lack of the visual standards and best practices of workmanship.

Manuel Yazijian, CMW21, AWCI President

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

As you are reading this month’s issue, summer is in full swing: hot and dry for those of us in the Southwest and mostly muggy and hot for the rest of the  country with a few spots of cool here and there. Regardless of the weather, many of us are preparing to attend our annual convention, August 21-23. Specifics are in the ensuing pages of this magazine as well as on our website, awci.com/symposium. If you’re reading this early enough, and you can make some free time on these dates, register first and stop by our convention. There may still be room to get in, and we’d love to have you.
Reflecting upon the events of this past month, we have two new directors elected to the Board of Directors, Aaron Recksiek and Joshua Kroman. Fred White has been reelected to the board. Congratulations to all three of you. I am looking forward to working with you all on the main mission of continuously elevating and maintaining the standards of workmanship in our profession. Also, a big thank you to the outgoing directors, Henry Kessler and Michal Blaszczyk. It’s been a pleasure serving with you.
     As some of you may know, I have quite a few heroes, the first being George Washington as the first American president for seeing an infant country through some very difficult times, but mostly because he ultimately went back to tending his farm, a move which is said to have bewildered the British. But, of course, the rest is history. As with all presidents, there are admirers and supporters as well as a fair share of critics—this comes with the territory. A famous quote comes to mind from yet another hero, President Abraham Lincoln: “You can please some of the people some of the time, all of the people some of the time, some of the people all of the time, but you can never please all of the people all of the time.” Which leads me to the third individual I admire, William Edwards Deming (October 14, 1900–December 20, 1993). Born in Sioux City, Iowa, he was an engineer, statistician, professor, author, lecturer, and management consultant. He is best known for his work in Japan after WW II, particularly for helping the leaders of the Japanese manufacturing industry rise out of the destruction and devastation of their economy. You may read more about Mr. Deming on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Edwards_Deming.
     Although watch service and maintenance may not be the same as manufacturing an automobile, motorbike, or shoes in the strictest of sense, in my opinion, we are facing some of the similar problems as the Japanese were prior to their adoption of Dr. Deming’s ideas and concepts.
     When you read Dr. Deming’s points and teachings, you will notice he places great emphasis on producing the highest quality of product, process, and/or service, and better (different) management of a system. While we may complain about a variety of situations, such as the lack of spare parts, and this is certainly a valid concern, the main issue still remains—the lack of the visual standards and best practices of workmanship in the repair sector. The lack of these visual standards leads to a “free for all” situation where those who adhere to high standards of workmanship are constantly battling with those who do not adhere to the would-be generally accepted visual standards and vice versa. This leads to a domino effect on several levels, which has repercussions all across the industry, mostly negative. It seems our current situation is nothing new, just read page 30 of this issue—watchmakers in the US endured the same issues as far back as 1934. Naturally, it would be preferable for all the major industry members to agree on a set of best practices that would be available for public consumption. Compared to the 1930s, we now have a different set of tools at our disposal, namely the availability of a wide array of electronic media that is quite affordable and freely available to a worldwide audience. This means, once everyone in our industry agrees on “red for stop, amber for caution/slow down, and green for go,” then we can all play on the same level field, and work ethics and integrity become a little less ambiguous. Until then, we will be going round and round in circles, and the never-ending search for those highly qualified individuals will forever be haunting our industry.
     Quoting a friend and colleague, Bernhard Stoeber, “A true professional does the right things (and things right) when nobody is watching.”  The question we must all ask ourselves is: “Am I doing the right things and things right when nobody is watching?”
     Keeping in tune with this month’s editorial focus on crystals, “One can better see the dial and hands after changing that scratched crystal, and our crystal is quite badly scratched. Things become crystal clear and we may or may not like what we see; but first, we need to change the crystal.”
     In the meantime, keep your skills honed, your standards very high, your attitude professional, your tools and equipment in great condition, and your workshops clean and organized—this is the only way we will excel.

A Message from Our AWCI President, July 2014

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Manuel Yazijian, CMW21, AWCI President

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
 July is here and I am very excited about the upcoming Annual Convention in Clinton, Maryland (just outside of Washington, DC). Early registration ends on July 15, so if you haven’t registered yet, call toll free 1-866-367-2924 (in the US) or 513-367-9800 if you are calling from overseas. An even easier way is to register online by visiting AWCI.com. Please take the time to read this month’s message from our Executive Director, Jordan Ficklin, as I am sure you will be quite pleased to hear about our upcoming activities and programs as well as all the great progress we are making.
     I’ve been attending the AWCI conventions since the year 2000, and I have to admit I have always enjoyed meeting with all of you. Ours is a relatively small community, and it’s nice to meet each other, share our knowledge, and gain new knowledge. The amount of information I have gained from the seminars has always been highly valuable, and I have learned from many of you. Thank you to all of you who have influenced me in a positive way. I have learned much from both old and young, and it has helped me realize we are what we do with ourselves. It is all in our own hands; learn to improve and have a positive outlook on life, and this is what you will attract. The opposite can also be true. The most dangerous phrase in our language is “We’ve always done it this way.” Do not think for one moment you know it all, as you will be severely humbled at the most unexpected moment. The only thing you can do is to continue to learn and improve.
     As many of you may already know, this is my life-chosen profession, and I have been directly involved in it since age 13, not to mention I was born into a watch-and-jeweler’s family. At a very young age in 1973, I barely remember my father going to the 125th Anniversary of the Omega Watch Company in Montreux, Switzerland. We were at the time an Omega and Tissot retailer. As you can see, I grew up with watches all around me and, yes, many of my school teachers would receive a nice watch from my father during Christmas as a token of appreciation for all their hard work. While my father had his retail store, he also had dedicated one room in our house as a watch-repair workshop where he would handle some minor repairs, such as crystal replacements, minor adjustments and such in the evenings and on some weekends. More involved and complex repairs were sent to his specialist watchmaker or authorized brand dealer. On some occasions, he would invite me to the workshop and let me see all the cabinets, drawers, tools, and equipment. I remember the first time I saw the eerily glowing green light of his Vibrograf B200 accompanied by its spooky tick tick tick sound. It definitely had a profound effect on me. Fast-forward to 2014—if you are still using the Vibrograf B200 without an amplitude meter (I understand, as I sometimes miss the B200’s green light and distinct tapping noise), there are now new alternatives that will help you do the job better and quicker. Come and check them out in person during the vendor fair.
     If you like and love watches and clocks, live with them, retail them, repair them, restore them, and everything that has to do with every aspect of horology, from sales to service, then we’re it! And while I can encourage you to attend, I also know you have your own obligations, such as your store, your workshop, or perhaps an employer to answer to. Regardless of the situation, I recognize the challenges involved in leaving your business for a day or two or more to attend a convention and seminar. But like my father who attended his first convention in Switzerland 41 years ago, which eventually led me to follow in his footsteps on so many levels, attending this convention may also be the first step in your long and fulfilling journey in horology. 
     Be kind to each other and help your fellow watchmaker and clockmaker any way you can, for what comes around also goes around.
     Until we meet this summer, keep your skills honed, your standards very high, your attitude professional, your tools and equipment in great condition, and your workshops clean and organized—this is the only way we will excel.

2014 Board of Directors Election Results

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The official results of this year’s election are in. I would like to thank everyone for their willingness to serve. Congratulations are in order for

Josh Kroman,

Aaron Recksiek,

and Fred White

who have earned the highest number of votes and will be serving on the board of directors for the next 3 years. Congratulations!

 

A huge thank you to Terry Kurdzionak for her service on the board of directors as the Industry Advisory Board Chair and for her continued willingness to serve as well as to Michael Michaels, Rob Gamber and Terry Curkan. We hope each of you will continue to work with AWCI in our mission to promote the art of watchmaking and clockmaking. There are always positions on committees available and next year as well.

 

Speaking of next year, the membership approved all of the constitutional changes which means next year there will only be 2 seats available on the board of directors and I wish to remind the membership that the right to nominate members to serve on the board of directors lies within the membership. Anyone who would like to serve on the Board of Directors (self-nomination is allowed), or anyone who would like to nominate a candidate for this position should contact the nomination committee by January 1, 2015.

Clcik to view the 2014 Election Results

A message from our President – December 2013

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Dearest member,
      As you read this message, you are most likely being asked for those special requests to finish that rush job just before the holiday season—we all know how that is. In my experience, December is always an exciting and busy time with sales and service quite often taking precedence over each other, and things can get quite blurry.
     Having said this, I will again discuss a topic I have discussed on many occasions since becoming president in August 2012, and that is quality of workmanship and price structure. By now, many of you who have followed my messages have come to realize my leadership is focused on workmanship of the highest standards. However, standards are hard to define if you cannot also show a clear example of them in practice. Regardless of the number of words printed on this and other pages, the written word cannot compare to a close-up picture of the item in question.
     Last month I discussed the use of the binocular microscope for the watchmaker at the bench. While for many this is a rather exotic item to have at or near the workbench, for others it is a standard item to have at the bench. The human eye has its limitations in viewing small objects, and since we live in the world of miniature items, a good microscope with a range of 20 to 50 power magnification, with several sources of powerful yet cool lighting, can be a great advantage in ensuring high-quality work and can help with troubleshooting. Once you experience the advantage of using the microscope, a whole new world of better work will be opened to you—but you will not know it until you try it.
     Of course, the usage of the binocular microscope has an initial effect of lowering productivity as the technician sees more things that can be potential problems. With sufficient practice and experience, a watchmaker can learn to set up the microscope in a convenient location where time is used efficiently, and only key areas of the movement are verified.
     Having touched upon the above where quality workmanship is truly being scrutinized and standards defined, let us talk about what keeps the lights on—the business aspect of the profession.
With higher quality being expected, more time is spent on a task, and, therefore, less is accomplished each day. However, better-quality work lasts longer and therefore you have fewer premature comebacks. The customer wins, the watchmaker wins, and the retailer wins by gaining a better reputation. This reputation is goodwill, which in turn translates into higher sales, the initial reason the retailer opened the retail store, right?

The following line is an interesting concept:
A service center does not necessarily have to be a profit center as long as it is a profit generator. 

To explain further, it basically implies a service center is designed to support the sales of merchandise; therefore, a high quality of workmanship is always required, and it is expected the service center should at the very least break even or at most make a profit of approximately 20–30%. This age-old formula has worked relatively well for service centers for a long time.
     Upsetting this formula is unfortunately quite easy, as many managers/retailers like to increase profit margin. However, it comes at the dear cost of quality. The higher the net profit margin, the higher the probability that shortcuts will be taken. It’s easy to take shortcuts, and the most susceptible target is the watch movement itself, which is hidden from the customer’s view and, therefore, it is hard for many watchmakers to assess since they mainly use one eye and a loupe of about 4x magnification. When the façade or the exterior of the timepiece is made the main focus, it becomes easy to cover up questionable workmanship.
If there is always a shortage of good quality horologists, perhaps it is because their highly valuable skills and knowledge are not always properly remunerated. What is a fair price to charge for a good watch repair?
     As friend and AWCI member Matt Hritz, CW21, said to me last year, “What if we were to ask the client, “How much does it cost to get a haircut?” With that in mind, we calculated that if one got a haircut on average 10 times a year at an average of $20 per basic haircut, that would translate to $200 per year. Over five years it would translate to $1,000 spent to maintain one’s hair. The price, I am told, is much more if you visit a “hair stylist/salon.” If today’s water-resistant mechanical watch functions five years on average between services, the haircut analogy could be used, and it is something many clients can relate to. Now, let’s think of what a barber invests in education, tools, and equipment versus what a watchmaker does, and it makes you think about your pricing structure all over again.
     As a closing message for this year, I wish you all a safe and happy holiday season enjoyed with your friends and loved ones with continued health and success for the upcoming year. It is my sincere wish that all of you continue to work while striving for the unattainable—perfection. Tools, equipment, workshop setup, education, and training are only a few parts of the equation.The ultimate goal is the final product, and isn’t that what really matters to us?

 

Manuel Yazijian, President AWCI

President’s Message – November 2013

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

Dearest member,

As you read this message, you are most likely being asked for those special requests to finish that rush job just before the holiday season – we all know how that is. In my experience, December is always an exciting and busy time with sales and service quite often taking precedence over each other and things can get quite blurry.

Having said this, I will discuss a topic which I have brought up on many occasions since becoming president in August 2012 and that is quality of workmanship and price structure.

By now, many of you who have followed my messages have come to realize this leadership is focused on workmanship of the highest standards. However, standards are hard to define if one is not shown such in a clear manner. Regardless of the number of letters that are printed on this and other pages, the written word does no justice when compared to a close-up picture or image of the item in question.

Last month I discussed the use of the binocular microscope for the watchmaker at the bench. While for many, this is a rather exotic item at or near the workbench, yet for many others, it is a standard item at every watchmaker’s bench. It is an undeniable fact that the human eye has its limitations in viewing small objects; since we live in the world of miniature items a good microscope with a range of 20 to 50 power magnification and with several sources of powerful yet cool lighting, can be of great advantage in ensuring high quality work as well as to help with troubleshooting. Once you experience the advantage of using the microscope, a whole new world of better work will be opened to you and you will not know it until you try it.  

Of course, the usage of the binocular microscope has an initial effect of lowering productivity as the technician sees more things that can be potential problems. With sufficient practice and experience a watchmaker can learn to set up the microscope in a convenient location where efficient use of time is made and only key areas of the movement are verified.

Having touched upon the above where quality workmanship is truly being scrutinized and standards defined, let us talk about what keeps the lights on – the business aspect of the profession.

With higher quality being expected, more time is spent on a task therefore less being accomplished per day; however, it is better quality work that lasts longer and therefore less premature comebacks. The customer wins, the watchmaker wins and the retailer wins in the form of better reputation – this reputation is goodwill which in turn translates into higher sales, the initial reason why the retailer opened the retail store, right? The following line is an interesting concept;

A service center does not necessarily have to be a profit center as long as it is a profit generator.

To explain further, it basically implies a repair center is designed to support the sales of merchandise, in this line, a high level of workmanship is absolutely crucial and as a result, the service center should at the very least break-even or at most make a net profit of approximately 20%. This percentage figure can vary slightly depending on the operation and this age-old formula has worked relatively well for service centers for a long time.

Upsetting this formula is unfortunately quite easy as many managers/retailers like to increase  profit margin, however it comes at the dear cost of quality. The higher the net profit margin, the higher the probability that shortcuts are taken. Shortcuts are easy to take and the most susceptible target is the watch movement itself, where it is hidden from the customer’s view and for that matter it is hard for many watchmakers to assess since they mainly use one eye and a loupe of about 4X magnification. When the façade or the exterior of the timepiece is made the main focus, it becomes an easy way to cover up questionable workmanship.

There is always a shortage of good quality horologists, perhaps it is because their highly valuable skills and knowledge is not always properly remunerated? What is a fair price to charge for a good watch repair you say?

As friend and AWCI member Matt Hritz, CW21 explained to me last year, “if we were to ask the client, how much does it cost to get a haircut?” With that in mind, we calculated if one were to get a haircut on average 10 times a year at an average of $20 per basic haircut – that would translate to $200 per year. Over 5 years it would translate to $1000 spent to maintain one’s hair. The price I am told is much more if you visit a “Hair Stylist/Salon”. If today’s water resistant mechanical watch lasts on an average of five years between services it could be argued the same analogy can be used and this is something many clients can relate to. Now let’s think of what a barber/hair stylist invests in education, tools, equipment and general overhead versus what a watchmaker does and it makes you think about your pricing structure all over again.    

As a closing message for this year I wish you all a safe and happy holiday period enjoyed with your friends and loved ones with continued health and success for the upcoming year. It is my sincere wish that all of you continue to work while striving for the unattainable – perfection. Tools, equipment, workshop setup, education and training are only some parts of the equation, the ultimate goal is the final product and isn’t that what really matters for us?

Tom’s Tips

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

 Click here to download a copy of Tom’s Tips

Tom's Tips

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AWCI Board Of Directors Meeting 05/07, 2013

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Minutes of AWCI Board Of Directors Meeting

Conference Call via gotomeeting

May 7, 2013 7:00pm CST

Board Members Present:
Manuel Yazijian
Terry Kurdzionak
Henry Kessler
Fred White
Jordan Ficklin
Tom Nesbit
Jason Ziegenbein
Ron Landberg 

Board Members Not Present
David Douglas
Wesley Grau
Justin Shiver
Michal Blazczyk 

Non Voting or Guests Present:
Paul Wadsworth
Keith Rosser
Mark Miller 

Meeting called to order at 7:12pm CST 

This meeting is being recorded by Manuel and we have a quorum per Paul Wadsworth. 

Discussion on Magazine Team is ahead of schedule.  June issue is in the works and July issue will be out 1st week of July. 

2013 05-07 #1 Motion made by Ron Landberg, 2nd by Henry Kessler to make Terry Kurdzionak current secretary to fill the vacated seat by David Douglas. 

Vote taken – Passes Unanimously 

Mark Miller Joined at 7:20pm CST 

Discussion on when the audit is to be completed, and how to let the membership know what is going on and what has happened.  

Discussion on getting a new Executive Director (E.D.)  Tom P. is no longer receiving compensation, and Jim L. receiving compensation until July 19th. 

Need to get the AWCI office and Board back to an “US” atmosphere and not a “WE & THEM” atmosphere.  Culture change is needed between the staff and Board. 

Discussion on who & what the E.D. should be and do.  The new E.D. should be mentored by Keith to get acclimated into the new role. 

Discussion with Keith about the IRA Plan currently in place. (Board was told that none of the staff has contributed to their IRA’s, therefore AWCI will discontinue contributing) 

2013 05-07 #2 Motion made by Henry Kessler, 2nd by Fred White – Move to eliminate annual IRA contributions for employees.  

Motion passed Unanimously 

2013 05-07 #3 Motion made by Jordan Ficklin, 2nd by Henry Kessler – Move to support acting executive Director Keith Rosser in eliminating all employee “Comp” time as of July 1, 2013. 

Motion passed Unanimously 

Discussion on new job titles for office staff. 

2013 05-07 #4  Motion made by Henry Kessler, 2nd by Tom Nesbit – Move that we accept the job titles proposed by the acting Executive Director Keith Rosser, for the new contract employees as well as that for employees Dana Boll and Daniela Ott.

Dana Boll – Creative Director, Magazines and Books
Kathy Ortt – Editor
Betsy Young – Marketing Director
Daniela Ott – Education Coordinator 

Motion passed – 1 abstention: Fred White 

Discussion on when and where the 2013 Convention should take place. Also discussion on face to face meeting to be held in Dallas at Henry Kessler’s business’ conference room for the finance committee & Executive board June 29th. 

2013 05-07 #5 Motion made by Terry Kurdzionak, 2nd by Fred White – Move that the annual meeting for the 2013 be held from September 26-28, 2013, at a place to be determined by the convention committee. 

Discussion as to where to have meeting and best prices for air fare and hotels.  Terry is working on finding most ideal location, and will report her  findings to board in due time. 

Motion passed – Unanimously 

Discussion on putting survey on back of ballot.  What questions should be asked and types of responses received.  

2013 05-07 #6 Motion made by Ron Landberg, 2nd by Henry Kessler – move to approve Keith Rosser’s proposal to do a survey on the back of the ballot for this year’s election, in order to establish a baseline from the voting members. 

Motion passed – unanimously 

2013 05-07 #7 Motion made by Fred White, 2nd by Terry Kurdzionak – to adjourn the meeting. 

Motion passed – Unanimously 

Meeting adjourned 9:25pm CST. 

Submitted by Beth Grau

AWCI Board Of Directors Meeting 06/04, 2013

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Minutes of AWCI Board Of Directors Meeting

Conference Call via gotomeeting

June 4, 2013 7:00pm CST

Board Members Present:
Manuel Yazijian  
Terry Kurdzionak
Henry Kessler
Wesley Grau 
Fred White
Jordan Ficklin
Jason Ziegenbein
Ron Landberg
Justin Shiver
Michal Blazczyk
David Douglas 

Board Members Not Present
Tom Nesbit 

Non Voting or Guests Present:
Paul Wadsworth
Keith Rosser
Mark Miller
Beth Grau 

Attendance taken at 7:00pm CST 

Meeting called to order at 7:12pm CST 

This meeting is being recorded by Manuel and we have a quorum per Paul Wadsworth. 

Discussion on Archie Perkins contract. 

Discussion on Computer issues in office.  Keith Rosser is taking care of.  

Discussion on financial issues.

2013 06-04 #1  Motion made by Henry Kessler, 2nd by Fred White – AWCI request that ELM loan $20K to AWCI, to be paid back in 2 months at no interest. NOTE:  request came from Keith Rosser in order to meet financial obligations.

Motion passed unanimously 

Discussion on hiring a new Executive Director (E.D.). 

2013 06-04 #2 Motion made by Henry Kessler, 2nd by Jason Z. – Motion for the BOD to go into Executive session with Keith Rosser and Mark Miller.

Motion passed – unanimously

Recording stopped for Executive meeting – 9:15pm CST for  45 Minutes

Recording started up again after Executive session

Discussion on Archie’s Contract to be signed.

2013 06-04 #3 Motion made by Fred White, 2nd by Ron Landberg, to Sign Archie Perkins Contract on publishing books.

Motion Passes

Terry Kurdzionak – opposes

Discussion on approving April’s minutes.

2013 06-04 #4 Voting to approve minutes.  Motion passes unanimously. 

2013 06-04 #5 Motion  to adjourn meeting by Wesley Grau, 2nd by Ron Landberg –

Motion passed – Unanimously 

Meeting adjourned 10:36pm CST. 

Respectfully submitted by Beth Grau

AWCI Board Of Directors Meeting 06/25, 2013

Friday, September 6th, 2013

AWCI Board of Directors Meeting Via conference call
Tuesday June 25, 2013
7 pm Central time

Board members present:
● Manuel Yazijian
● Michal Blazczyk
● Jason Ziegenbein
● Tom Nesbit
● Jordan Ficklin
● Terry Kurdzionak
● Henry Kessler
● Wes Grau
● Justin Shiver
● David Douglas
● Fred White
● Ron Landberg

Non Voting/Guests present
● Paul Wadsworth, parliamentarian
● Dennis Warner, Past President
● Beth Grau, Recorder of minutes

Meeting called to order at 7:05pm Central time.

Motion 2013_ 06_ 25 #1  Jordan Ficklin moved to approve May 7th meeting minutes.  2nd by David Douglas

Motion passed

Motion 2013_06_25 #2  to approve June 4th meeting minutes by Ron Landberg, 2nd by Justin Shiver.
Motion passed

Discussion on situation with office staff concerning current employees and Keith.  The Executive Board needs to keep rest of board apprised of the goings on within the issues of day to day operations.

Motion 2013 06_25 #3  made by Henry Kessler to go into executive session, 2nd by Justin Shiver at 7:25pm
Motion passes

Motion 2013_06_25 #4 to go out of executive session by Wesley Grau, 2nd by Henry Kessler.

Moved out of executive session at 8:28pm

Discussion to leave structure of AWCI as is.
Every Board member was asked their opinion and viewpoint on the situation;
What the Executive Director should be expected to do.

Some feel we need a strong marketing person, capable of travel to meet members of the watch and jewelry industry to learn what is needed, promote our courses and offerings, develop alliances, etc., while also managing our creative and editorial staff in the creation of HT, and also interacting on the same level cooperatively with our Educational Director and our part time CFO and bookkeeper. Others feel we need a
top person responsible for all. Some would like this person to have watchmaking experience, nonprofit experience, small organization management experience, etc. These all must be weighed.

Motion 2013_ 06_25 #5 made by Wesley Grau,  2nd by Ron Landberg to keep current structure in place with addendum that allows education and bookkeeper to address the BOD.

Keep the current structure of staffing, allowing for staff to communicate with the ED, and the ED communicates with the EC, who communicates with the BOD. If any employee feels their manager is harming them or the org, then they move up one level, even if that means jumping to the EC.

Employee – Manager – ED – EC – BOD

Motion Passed, one abstention

Discussion on the Executive Director position and qualifications:
Proven Leadership,

Discussion on salary and Benefits

Henry sending Keith letter to draft qualifications for ED advertisement. 

Voted to keep structure as is

Motion 2013_06_25 #6 on spare parts from Jordan Ficklin:

I move to rescind the Spare Parts Policy adopted by the board of directors on October 16, 2009 and replace it with the statement below:
 
The American Watchmakers-Clockmakers Institute stands in support of all watchmakers and timepiece owners. 
 
We declare that the best way for manufacturers to provide service to their customers is to support a diversified service network which includes independent watchmakers, retailers, and service centers and to allow customers to choose where they would like their timepiece serviced. Manufacturers who freely distribute technical information, brand specific tools, and training to interested watchmakers will improve the service experience for their customers and create both goodwill and loyalty. Watchmakers who deliver high quality customer service by adhering to the standards & practices of the American Watchmakers-Clockmakers Institute will, in turn, earn the loyalty of their customers.
 
We encourage all watchmakers whether self-employed, working in a retail environment, or employed by the manufacturer, to strive for excellence and abide by the standards and practices set forth by AWCI.  Access to genuine spare parts is critical to this endeavor and as such we call upon manufacturers and distributors of timepieces to make spare parts available at fair and reasonable prices to all watchmakers. 
 
I move that the attached letter be emailed to membership immediately and that the same letter be published in the next edition of Horological Times.  This same policy should be added to the policy manual. 

Motions were seconded by Justin Shiver for discussion

A lengthy discussion ensued and each board member gave his/her opinion on the spare parts situation and its impact on our membership.

Roll call vote to adopt the motion, all in the affirmative except for Wes Grau who had to leave the meeting prior to the vote.

Motion to adjourn made by Ron Landberg, second by Terry Kurdzionak
Meeting adjourned at 9:35 PM Central time.

These minutes were started by Beth Grau and completed by Terry Kurdzionak

     Respectfully submitted,

     Terry Kurdzionak